Reader Submitted: Lakewood saves the State of NJ close to a BILLION dollars – study finds

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Information provided by a recent study conducted by a facebook page, Rise Up Ocean County, found that Lakewood saves the State of New Jersey close to a billion dollars by sending over 32,000 students to private schools over public schools.

There are more than 32,000 students in over 150 private schools in Lakewood, if they would receive the same amount of State funding per student as Newark does, at $22,555 per student, those students would receive $721,760,000 from the state. Being that Lakewood would also have to acquire buildings for the vast influx of student body, a rough estimate easily adds another $180 million to that amount, bringing the number slightly above $900,000,000.

Of course, as RUOC points out there is no guarantee that Lakewood would receive the same amount per student as Newark, RUOC estimates $18,535 per student which gives us the amount at $593,120,000, if you add the estimated $180 million for buildings you are up to $773,120,000 – more then three quarters of a billion dollars!

(As a side point – It is interesting to note that RUOC which takes great pride in their superior education, seems to have made a simple math miscalculation, RUOC calculates $18,535 multiplied by 38,200 students (Private & public school children) at $708,056,000 however this is not the case, rather the total would be 708,037,000.

Don’t expect RUOC to acknowledge their mistake, RUOC never makes mistakes.)

Much thanks to RUOC for research provided, hopefully, this will shed light on the common misconception that Lakewood is a strain on society.

Shloimy Goldhar

17 COMMENTS

  1. The savings means nothing if the public schools are bankrupt and not delivering a quality education to the secular students in the district.

  2. Regarding the silly side point, the discrepancy amounts to $19,000, which, when divided by 38,200, comes out to less than 50 cents per student. So what happened here is that they rounded down for simplicity (you don’t include the pennies in such a large number in an article), but in truth the actual number is what they said it is. You took their rounded down number and divided it by 38,200, and got a different number, obviously. Whatever the validity of the point that you are trying to make, it just lost credibility due your calling them out for a non-mistake.

  3. Haha that’s pretty funny that they made a mistake in the math. @Dr. Nat it is pretty obvious that you are the one who wrote the article since nobody else would have figured that out. So why don’t you explain to everyone why are you making such a big deal about food stamps ect. When they are saving the state more then they are taking?

    • Chaim, I will let you in on a little secret: Dr. Nat is neither a doctor, nor is he a member of RUOC. He is just someone who paid attention in math class in 6th grade in Cheder, which, evidently, you have neglected to do.

      • Hahaha!!! Now you just name called Chaim for a non mistake…being literal definitely is not wrong! What a hypocrite:)

  4. @professer Nat. You have a pretty good sense of humor which doesn’t always come through in your writing on RUOC.

    I just did the math again. So actually the number between $14,516 and $22,555 is $18535.50. if they were rounding the number like they taught you in 6th grade “at the cheder” they would have rounded up to $18,536.

    Yours truly,
    Chaim

    • @Chaim, I don’t even think you read my comment. Please don’t make me add reading comprehension to your course list.

  5. Also when rounding numbers you should write approximately, so people know number is rounded. So they should have written
    “State aid per student would fall directly in the middle of the two figures above [at approximately] $18,535/student.

  6. @Dr Nat I read your comment again and I really don’t understand it.

    You said “You took their rounded down number and divided it by 38,200, and got a different number, obviously. ” My question is that the number should not have been rounded down rather rounded up. Please explain.

    You said the difference is less then $.50. that’s true that based on the number they wrote it is less then $.50 however the true number should have been $708,056,100 ($18,535.50 x 38,200) in which case it’s exactly $.50.

    Please explain.

  7. Chaim,

    You are mixing up two different parts of the article. I was referring to the second part where he says the following:

    “(As a side point – It is interesting to note that RUOC which takes great pride in their superior education, seems to have made a simple math miscalculation, RUOC calculates $18,535 multiplied by 38,200 students (Private & public school children) at $708,056,000 however this is not the case, rather the total would be 708,037,000.”

    The author of the article was quibbling with their math, which was that $18,535 times 38,200 should actually be $708,037,000, and not the $708,056,000, which was the number given by RUOC.

    At face value, the author seems to be correct, as 18,535 x 38,200 is actually 708,037,000. However, if you think into it a drop, you will see that it is not really a mistake. The difference between 708,056,000 and 708,037,000 is 19,000. This means that they were off in their calculations by $19,000. If you take that $19,000 and divide it by 38,200 students, that actually comes out to less than 50 cents per student, which is negligible when you are talking numbers of over $18,000 per student. So in truth the actual number was $18,535.49 per student, which, when multiplied by 38,200 students, actually comes out to be the correct $708,056,000. But when they quoted the factors that calculated to this product, they merely rounded down to $18,535 as is standard practice. Again, we are talking about 49 cents out of $18,535.49, which is less than 0.003% of the total, and that is what was being called out as their “mistake”.

    Now, while I dislike RUOC as much as the rest of us, I was merely pointing out that if the author would have focused on the main point of the article, instead of making an issue of this non-mistake, his point would have been even stronger.

    Clear now?

  8. Since you did Teshuva and said you dislike them, I will not correct you that the difference is really $.50 like I already pointed out. Nor will I recommend a course on reading comprehension, rather I will just leave things the way they are.

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